Aaron Dunbrack

Aaron Dunbrack is concerned with the little things

As a quadruple major in astronomy, physics, math and philosophy, Aaron draws from every aspect of his UMass Amherst education to pursue his research in subatomic particles.

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UMass Video Profile Series Transcript :Aaron Dunbrack

My school offered a system through which you could search through colleges. When I was looking through that, I was looking for a school that had an Astrophysics program. UMass came up because it has an Astronomy program with an Astrophysics track. UMass allows me to do four majors simultaneously because they allow me a lot of freedom in what I do. Among other things, I've been able to take graduate classes here, I've been able to participate in a number of clubs, and I've been able to take a class in a wide variety of topics with more breadth than I would perhaps be able to get at another university. So in 2013, Large Hadron Collider discovered the Higgs boson, which was a revolution in experimental physics and also a giant theoretical step forward in that it provided experimental evidence for something that had been theorized for a long time, but never directly observed. My research is focused on looking at other particles of a similar kind, which are motivated by solving various problems in both astronomy and physics. The value of UMass to me is that it allows me to pursue simultaneously everything I'm interested in to some degree while pursuing the things I'm interested in most to a large degree. The freedom that comes with being at a large school allows me to do more than I might perhaps be able to do at a smaller school. I'm Aaron Dunbrack, I'm a quadruple major in Astronomy, Physics, Math, and Philosophy. I stand for doing theoretical physics research in order to learn about the world around us, and I stand for UMass.

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